Author Topic: The State of Englishness  (Read 20386 times)

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Religious Dick

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The State of Englishness
« on: May 26, 2008, 01:16:46 PM »
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Published on The Brussels Journal (http://www.brusselsjournal.com)
The State of Englishness
By A. Millar
Created 2008-05-26 10:13
A few days ago (Friday, May 23rd) 18 year-old Ben Smith was stopped, in a routine check by a police officer, while driving his Vauxhall Corsa to his home in Melksham, Wiltshire. The officer found nothing amiss, but noticed an England flag on the parcel shelf (which Mr. Smith used to cover his music system from potential thieves) and ordered him to remove it. According to Smith:

    He saw the flag and said it was racist towards immigrants and if I refused to take it down I would get a ?30 fine. I laughed because I thought he was joking, but then I realized he was serious so I had to take it down straight away. I thought it was silly ? it's my country and I want to show my support for my country.


This is merely the latest in a long line of such ?politically correct? discrimination on the part of England?s authorities or its employees. In January 2007, a 27 year old man was ordered by Bedford Council to take down an England flag, that he had hung on the side of his house. In 2006 a fire station was ordered to remove an England flag, because, they were told, it might offend ethnic minorities (despite the local mosque protesting that it did not), and earlier this year a government report revealed that children were routinely punished for wearing clothing bearing the English flag.

But, then, ?England? is a subversive idea to a government that wants to hold the United Kingdom (UK) together, to sink it into the homogenizing machine of the European Union (EU). And ?England? and English nationalism are anathema to political correctness. We have seen this before, of course. A few decades ago a rising Scottish nationalism was considered a threat to the UK.

To combat this rise, the chief secretary of the Treasury in James Callaghan?s Labour government, Joel Barnett, was asked to devise a system of distributing funds between England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. While this was supposed to be a fair, as well as temporary system, the Barnett formula remains, and, today, means that 8 billion pounds (approximately 16 billion U.S. dollars) are diverted to Scotland every year, giving the Scottish government approximately 1,500 pounds more per person. Wales enjoys a similar financial advantage. Moreover, in 1998 the British government granted devolution to Scotland and Wales, creating a Scottish Parliament and a Welsh Assembly. It did not, however, devolve any powers to England, which remains the only country in Europe without national representation. Consequently, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish MPs are able to vote the House of Commons, on matters that are limited to England, though English MPs have no reciprocal right.

All of this, in practical terms, has meant that residents of Scotland enjoy free college tuition, free parking, free healthcare, free dental check-ups, etc., while residents of England do not. Some medications are also free in Scotland that must be paid for in England. Similar benefits are afforded residents of Wales and Ireland. The Times recently commented, ?As they contemplate higher food and fuel costs, rising council tax and poor services, they increasingly ask: why should the English get so much less than the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish?? This question is being asked, though mostly by those who live close to Scotland or Wales. The town of Berwick-upon-Tweed has even voted to become a part of Scotland, and the village of Audlem, Cheshire, to become a part of Wales, although such protests probably have little effect beyond highlighting the disparity.

Nevertheless, a turn toward localism is already making strides across Europe, and there is a growing sentiment toward devolution and even the eventual independence of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The S.N.P. is fighting to make Scotland (population of just over 5 million) an independent country, Plaid Cymru is seeking the same for Wales (3 million), as Sin Fein is for Northern Ireland (slightly less tan 1.75). Sin Fein also wants an eventual reunification with Southern Ireland.

Independence might seem a difficult sell to the electorate of these countries, but their nationalist parties have long been established. Plaid Cymru and the S.N.P. point out on their websites that some of the richest nations on the planet are likewise some of the smallest (e.g., Norway and Iceland), and both see independence as advantageous in negotiating with the E.U. It will be worth mentioning that Plaid Cymru is unhappy with the Barnett formula, and cites this as another reason for full independence:

    [?] the current ?Barnett Formula? for the funding of Wales is outdated and unfair. It is not a question of whether Wales can afford to be independent but whether it can afford NOT to be independent.

    [?] the amount of public expenditure devolved to Wales is based on population rather than needs of Wales. Under the current devolution settlement the Barnett Formula should be altered to ensure a fairer funding formula for Wales.

The issue is pressing. A referendum on Scottish independence looks set to take place in 2010. England has a population of over 50 million (i.e., approximately 10 times that of Scotland), but is ill prepared for an independence that seems increasingly likely. Its dominant political parties remain committed to keeping the U.K. Conservative leader David Cameron, has denounced ?narrow English nationalism,? and what he calls, ?the ugly stain of separatism.? The B.N.P. even seeks to enlarge Britain, welcoming Eire, ?in a federation of the nations of the British Isles.? Labour and the Liberal Democrats are both staunchly pro-UK and pro-EU.

However, several organizations have been established in recent years, calling for an English Parliament (which is supported by nearly 70 percent of England?s population), and England?s first, and, indeed, only civic nationalist political party ? The English Democrats ? was founded in 2002. According to its manifesto, the English Democrats aims, ?to build a society which accommodates the interests of all the people of England,? which would have its own ?parliament and executive,? and a ?wide-ranging Bill of Rights founded on traditional English civil liberties.?

The party also calls for a ?complete end? to mass immigration, tougher border controls, ?the deportation of all illegal immigrants,? and fines, and ?possible withdrawal of trading rights [?]? for companies employing them, etc. On, ?England and Multiculturalism,? it says:

    It is a fact that during the past forty years people of many different cultures have come to live in England. Our country is in that sense a multi-cultural society.

    However, multiculturalism is an ideology which suggests that a mix of many cultures in one society is desirable and that it is the duty of government to actively encourage cultural diversity within the state. Further, it suggests that all cultures should be treated as equal. A logical extension of this is that all languages, histories and law codes should be treated equally. This is clearly impossible in a unified country. All ethnic groups should be free to promote their own culture and identity but the public culture of England should be that of the indigenous English. This position is consistent with the rights of indigenous nations everywhere.

A certain pragmatic localism is inherent in its position on the composition and democracy of England. Devolution should not be merely to England, but ?within England,? through the current structure of local government. It aims, it says, ?[?] to enable local people to identify with Local Authorities,? and would use referenda to allow people a greater say over local issues. In regard to composition, while the EU is attempting to impose regions on its now member countries, that effectively divide them up, marrying them to those of other countries, the English Democrats not only support withdrawing from the EU, but favors, ?recognition for traditional counties, which would include the reunification of Yorkshire.? This county, has existed for 1100 years, but, reflecting EU strategy, has been broken up over the years into various administrative regions. Respect for traditional counties may seem a minor point to many, but it might prove the only option in a future that is looking local. In the last couple of weeks we have heard about the rise of Cornish nationalism (i.e., of the county of Cornwall), with its language (which has only 300 fluent speakers) looking set to gain official recognition.
Source URL:
http://www.brusselsjournal.com/node/3288
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Stray Pooch

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2008, 02:45:53 AM »
Trust me, the American flag is WELL on its way to being banned (unless it is in the process of being burned which is, of course, an act of free speech).
Oh, for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention . . .

Religious Dick

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2008, 02:55:52 AM »
Well, apparently the good citizens of England and other European countries have had enough and are finally starting to rebel. Which gives me some hope for America. Perhaps, like alcoholics, nations have to hit bottom before they start to recover....
I speak of civil, social man under law, and no other.
-Sir Edmund Burke

Xavier_Onassis

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2008, 03:35:27 AM »
Trust me, the American flag is WELL on its way to being banned (unless it is in the process of being burned which is, of course, an act of free speech).
===============================================================
On the shoulder of every cop in the country, flying from the pole of over half the Toyota and Hyundai dealers, supposedly part of the uniform of every public official or candidate for public office. Every kid in the country has to swear loyalty to it and include God in the statement.

Yeah, sure, it'll be banned at any moment.

Perhaps you have said something more worthy of trust here.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2008, 07:00:10 AM by Xavier_Onassis »
"Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana."

Stray Pooch

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2008, 08:04:53 AM »
On the shoulder of every cop in the country, flying from the pole of over half the Toyota and Hyundai dealers, supposedly part of the uniform of every public official or candidate for public office. Every kid in the country has to swear loyalty to it and include God in the statement.

Yeah, sure, it'll be banned at any moment.

Perhaps you have said something more worthy of trust here.

There have already been cases of the flag being ordered off of firetrucks by mayors and other such things.  The reasons were exactly the same - supposed "racism" or other such political incorrectness.  It won't happen quickly or completely, but it will happen.
Oh, for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention . . .

Amianthus

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2008, 08:53:17 AM »
Every kid in the country has to swear loyalty to it and include God in the statement.

The Oath of Allegiance hasn't been said in schools for many years.
Do not anticipate trouble, or worry about what may never happen. Keep in the sunlight. (Benjamin Franklin)

Xavier_Onassis

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2008, 09:14:31 AM »
The Oath of Allegiance hasn't been said in schools for many years.

It's called the PLEDGE of Allegiance, and it is said daily in every school in Miami-Dade County.

In any event, the US Flag, is not going to be banned, restricted, or otherwise restricted in the US, as was alleged by Stray Pooch.

It is not "well on its way to being banned", nor have I seen that proposed by anyone, ever.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2008, 09:17:01 AM by Xavier_Onassis »
"Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana."

_JS

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2008, 12:56:22 PM »
The article is idiotic.

The "Barnett Formula" is not what is used to determine the apportionment to the other countries of the United Kingdom. It is a decision made every year by the Chancellor and passed by a Sovereign Parliament. A rudimentary knowledge of the UK Government would recognize that all Parliaments are sovereign. They cannot be restricted by previous Parliamentary law.

There are small, wealthy nations in Europe. What the article does not tell you and what RD would never dare to tell you is that they are primarily socialist. Norway, Iceland, and Denmark (notice that thew article selects two Nordic states ;) ).

No, instead it bitches and moans about one anecdote of a guy with a flag, where indeed one does NOT get the entire story.

Wales has been a part of England for nearly eight centuries. Scotland has been in union with England and Wales for slightly longer than the United States has existed. It is one nation with one sovereign Parliament. Northern Ireland is a different matter completely.

All of these issues are unique to the United Kingdom. This is not some horrible disaster of multiculturalism. There were Welsh and Scottish independents long before immigrants arrived from the colonies into the UK. What a rubbish article.
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Religious Dick

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2008, 03:25:48 PM »
So where have you been, JS? Under the bed looking for racists?  ;D
I speak of civil, social man under law, and no other.
-Sir Edmund Burke

kimba1

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2008, 04:08:02 PM »
I find strange no mention of anyone just saying it`s not racist
almost feel like the charge that the flag is racist .
I get the idea from people protesting the right to wave the conferderate flag and show minorities thier place.

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2008, 06:00:08 PM »
Things like the confederate flag, racist language, etc...are just secondary factors of racism. They are symbols.

Racism is a function of an entire system.

F(racism) Domination = Prejudice + Exploitation

Essentially, racism, at least in the western world as we know it, is the establishment of white = human and white = normal. There is a very interesting book that a psychiatrist named Kovel wrote in the 1970's called The Psychoanalysis of Racism. I've read much more modern views, but have rarely read better books than that one.

It is extremely interesting to read and understand what actions and words tell you about the individual and society that promotes racism. You see very common themes appear in the United States, South Africa, and many other places.
I smell something burning, hope it's just my brains.
They're only dropping peppermints and daisy-chains
   So stuff my nose with garlic
   Coat my eyes with butter
   Fill my ears with silver
   Stick my legs in plaster
   Tell me lies about Vietnam.

Universe Prince

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2008, 06:11:17 PM »
Quote from: The Brussels Journal

The issue is pressing. A referendum on Scottish independence looks set to take place in 2010. England has a population of over 50 million (i.e., approximately 10 times that of Scotland), but is ill prepared for an independence that seems increasingly likely.


Alba gu bra!

Quote from: The Brussels Journal

Its dominant political parties remain committed to keeping the U.K. Conservative leader David Cameron, has denounced "narrow English nationalism," and what he calls, "the ugly stain of separatism."


Yeah, some years ago here in the U.S. we had some states try to separate themselves in the name of protecting their sovereignty and their culture. That didn't really work out so well.

Quote from: The Brussels Journal

All ethnic groups should be free to promote their own culture and identity but the public culture of England should be that of the indigenous English. This position is consistent with the rights of indigenous nations everywhere.


The indigenous English? Does that include the Normans? The Saxons? Well, it would have to include the Saxons, now wouldn't, since we're talking about the English (the word English being derived from an old Anglo-Saxon name for themselves). But then, where does that leave the Celts?

Quote from: The Brussels Journal

This position is consistent with the rights of indigenous nations everywhere.


And here in the U.S., we plan on reforming our culture so it better reflects that of the Native Americans... no, no we're not. Can you tell yet that I find worrying over protecting indigenous culture to be just a bit ridiculous?

And by the way, what, exactly, is "Englishness" anyway?
Your reality, sir, is lies and balderdash and I'm delighted to say that I have no grasp of it whatsoever.
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Rich

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2008, 06:17:25 PM »
>>And by the way, what, exactly, is "Englishness" anyway?<<


_JS

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2008, 06:19:23 PM »
The protest, Prince, of what you said would be that you are dealing with countries in the United Kingdom, not merely states.

The other side of the coin is that you are exactly right in that the English, Welsh, and Scottish are so inter-mixed that it is ridiculous to promote nationalism in those countries. This is especially true of Wales, where the English and Welsh are for all practical purposes one people.

England is just as divided as any country as well. Northern England is far different than Southern England (especially the Southeast). Ask any Mancunian or Scouser what they think of London, then ask a Londoner what he or she thinks of Manchester or Liverpool. You'll find as much difference there as that between Cardiff and Glasgow.
I smell something burning, hope it's just my brains.
They're only dropping peppermints and daisy-chains
   So stuff my nose with garlic
   Coat my eyes with butter
   Fill my ears with silver
   Stick my legs in plaster
   Tell me lies about Vietnam.

Rich

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Re: The State of Englishness
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2008, 06:20:49 PM »
>>no, no we're not. Can you tell yet that I find worrying over protecting indigenous culture to be just a bit ridiculous?<<

Jews in Europe felt much the same. As did the Spanish before the Muslim's hords stormed in. History is full of examples.



(Sorry, but the pics just felt right)